Episode 139

full
Published on:

24th Apr 2023

Don't Stop Chasing Rainbows with Rick Bleiweiss

"I don't think I'll ever stop, and I don't think anyone else should."

My special guest is Rick Bleiweiss

Rick Bleiweiss is an experienced publishing executive, author, and former music industry professional. He has worked with renowned superstars and produced over 50 records, including one Grammy-nominated album.

At 77 years old, Rick published his first novel, "Pignon Scorbion and the Barbershop Detectives," which became Amazon's number one bestselling cozy mystery and number one historical mystery.

In our conversation, Rick shared his insights on staying creative and engaged as we age.

In this episode, you will be able to:

  • Discover the creative spark behind Rick Bleiweiss's captivating Pignon Scorbion series.
  • Uncover the significance of chasing rainbows and engaging in hobbies for mental enrichment.
  • Embrace the value of mentorship and absorbing knowledge from younger colleagues.
  • Hear about his belief in the importance of never giving up on personal goals or aspirations, regardless of one's age.

Episode Takeaways:

  1. Have fun!
  2. Don't stop living just because you are aging
  3. Take shots. "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take."
  4. Think of your life positively. "You are always going to be disappointed if all you remember are your failures."

Thanks so much for listening.

Follow us on FacebookInstagram and LinkedIn

You can email me with questions or comments at wendy@heyboomer.biz

Join us for the Boomer Banter, the third Tuesday of each month. Sign up at heyboomer.biz

You can find Rick at rickbleiweiss.com or email him at createdbyrick@gmail.com  

Mentioned in this episode:

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Transcript

Wendy Green:

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Hello and welcome to the Hey Boomer show.

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The show for those of us who believe that we are never too old to set another goal or

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dream a new dream.

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My name is Wendy Green and I am your host for.

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Hey. Hey, Boomer.

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This weekend.

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I was out in my garden quite a bit.

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I have a raised bed garden and in there I have about six sugar snap

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peas that are really looking healthy.

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I have two pepper plants, all of which are looking good and a couple of tomato plants, a

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lettuce that's really struggling.

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It's not looking real happy.

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My fig tree.

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My fig tree is waking up, new leaves bursting up to the sun.

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It's wonderful.

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I planted I planted wildflowers last week, fertilized everything.

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I just love, love, love this time of year.

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But fortunately, we also had some rain this weekend and I was able to snuggle up on my

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couch and finish reading the second book in the Pinion Scorpion series Murder and

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Hackford. And our guest today, Rick Bleiweiss, has written two of these Pinion

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Scorpion books.

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They deal with barber shop detectives.

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They're really fun books.

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He's also written a short story in an anthology called Hotel California Another

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Mystery. So they they are fun.

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They have definitely kept my interest and I wasn't able to figure out the whodunit, darn

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it. And I really tried.

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So I'm going to bring Rick on in a few minutes.

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Hi, David. Before I bring him on, I want to talk about our sponsor, Rhodes Scholar.

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So all sound like fun options.

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You can go check out the Road scholar.

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Opportunities for travel at road scholar.org slash.

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Hey boomer. And please do.

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Use the slash hey boomer because that lets them know that you heard about their.

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Their offers from this show and it keeps them happy as a sponsor.

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You've also heard me talk about the boomer banter.

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It has been so much fun.

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It's an online virtual community where we get together once a month on the third

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Tuesday of every month, and we talk and we talk about all kinds of various topics and we

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learn and we grow together.

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But I was asking some of the people that come to the banter why they come, you know,

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what do they get out of it?

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So here are a couple of the answers I got.

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One person said I joined the banter for the camaraderie, the community and an opportunity

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to meet and engage with new people.

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It was so much fun.

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It was something I wanted to continue and something I look forward to every month.

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Another person said, I really like the banter because you give me something new to

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think about, and I enjoy hearing other perspectives and meeting new people.

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Another person said it's fun to meet people and exchange ideas, opinions, laughs.

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Et cetera. And I work alone all day, so it's good to see faces and hear voices in a

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non-work mode.

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I also enjoy it because it's a fun after dinner activity.

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Sort of like dessert with friends.

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Don't you love that dessert with friends?

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And that is definitely what it would be for East Coast people because we meet from 630 to

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730 East Coast time, like I said, on the third Wednesday, a third Tuesday of every

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month. But for you, West Coast people you could think about.

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Life is short.

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Have dessert first and then join us and have dinner afterwards.

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If you are interested in finding out more about the banter signing up for the

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membership, you can find it on the Hey Boomer home page at Hey Boomer showbiz Busy.

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$12 a month.

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You can try it out for one month and see if you like it or it's a $116 for the year.

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So come and join our community.

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We would love to have you there.

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All right. So let me tell you a bit about Rick.

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I've seen so many fun people.

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Okay. So Rick Rick has been a publishing executive, author, newspaper and magazine

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columnist, former music industry executive and record producer in the music industry.

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He worked.

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He worked with many superstars and film soundtracks and produced over 50 records,

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including one that was Grammy nominated.

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Since 2006, Rick has been head of business development for Blackstone Publishing and

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audio acquiring works by numerous bestselling authors and celebrities.

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At 78 years old, oh, he was 77 at 77.

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His first novel, Pinion Scorpion and the Barbershop Detectives, was published to great

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acclaim and was Amazon's number one bestselling cozy mystery and number one

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historical mystery.

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Rick's second book in the series Murder and Hackford, though when I finished this

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weekend, was published this past February and Rick is now 78.

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Additionally, his story in the Mystery anthology Hotel California has received great

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reviews. Rick is a member of the international thriller Writers, Mystery

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Writers of America, historical Novel Society, Sisters in Crime and the Pacific

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Northwest Writers Association, among other organizations.

Wendy Green:

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Wow. Rick, welcome to the show.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Thank you, Andy.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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I'm glad to be here.

Wendy Green:

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I'm I have enjoyed every time we've talked, so I'm glad to bring you to this audience.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Cool.

Wendy Green:

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So we call this show Rick Don't Stop Chasing Rainbows.

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And we called it that because that was something you mentioned to me the first time

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we talked. Can you tell me what you mean about not not stopping chasing rainbows?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Yes, surely.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Well, basically, my whole life I've kind of been an entrepreneur and a creative person,

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both business and creative, kind of have a left brain, right brain going on

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simultaneously. And I've always just tried new things, whether it was in in business I

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were working for or on my own as a venture person, on my own entrepreneur.

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And now that I'm older, I don't see any reason why I shouldn't keep doing what I've

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been doing my whole life, chasing the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

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And, you know, I.

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I find the chase is exciting.

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And, you know, sometimes you find the pot of gold, sometimes you don't.

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But, you know, if you have the energy and the enthusiasm and the interest, just I don't

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think I'll ever stop and I don't think anyone else should.

Wendy Green:

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So you are now chasing a pot of gold as a writer and as an executive in the publishing

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industry. And then you were telling me about something else earlier.

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What? What other rainbows are you chasing?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Well, I'm.

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I'm in the toward the end of writing a film script of a original idea.

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I have and have had.

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And the best way I could describe it is it would sort of be like if Home Alone met the

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Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.

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Um, I'll leave that up to everybody's imagination as to what that would result in,

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and hopefully you might see it on the silver screen one day or.

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Want to see it.

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I do want to see it because it sounds like so much fun.

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Have you ever written a movie script before?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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No, not really.

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I know I bought a film script writing online program and I did

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research and I read that's how we do a lot of things I do.

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And I just started writing the film script.

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And I've got a couple of friends who have written film scripts and they said, As soon

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as I'm done with it, they'd like to read it and they'll make sure it's in the right

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format and hopefully they'll enjoy it too.

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Oh, that sounds great.

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But let's talk about some of the mystery books that you've written.

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So I'm always curious how people come up with ideas for stories and and and and while

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you're telling me that, how did you come up with his name?

Wendy Green:

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Pinion Scorpion.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Okay, I'll start with how I came up with his name.

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Okay. And the real answer is research, because I did a ton of research to get the

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minutia right in these books.

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And part of that was names.

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You know, I made sure I knew what names were popular in the era.

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Et cetera. But as far as Scorpion goes, I kind of wanted to come up with a name that

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was similar in its uniqueness, if you will, to Sherlock Holmes and Hercule Poirot.

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Those are not your run of the mill everyday names.

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So I wanted a character who had a distinctive name and I knew and I'll get to

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how I write and it's part of how I knew.

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I knew his ancestry would be Egyptian father and Haitian mother.

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That was just part of what came to me.

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And so I started researching Arabic and Egyptian last names, family names, and I came

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across many of them.

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And when I came across Scorpion, which stood for adventurous and entrepreneurial, which

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applied to his father in the first book, there's a backstory of how his dad and mom

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met. I just realized it fit the character and it was a familiar sounding word because

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it was like Scorpion, right?

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But it's just a little offshoot of it.

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So I liked that.

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And then as I'm researching Haiti, I find that there is an actual mountain and valley

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in Haiti called Pinon that was named after the French Explorer, who was the first

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European to go to that region.

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And that's where I postulated in the book Scorpion's mother came from.

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So I just thought it'd be cool to ceremoniously name him after the Pinion

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region. And then when I strung them together, I liked the way Pinion Scorpion

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worked as a name.

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Yeah, and I'm glad that you put the actual correct pronunciation in the book, because I

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would never have gotten it right otherwise.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Few people have called him Pinon Agree.

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Dignan Right. That's how it looks.

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Pignan But I like Pinon.

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That sounds much more sophisticated.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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And as to how I write, you know, there are plotters and there are pantsers there may be

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others as well.

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Plotters plot out everything they're going to write beforehand.

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They may have sticky notes on the wall or bullet points or outlines, and I don't write

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like that at all.

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I am a pantser.

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I fly by the seat of my pants and I just see the stories play out in my mind, like movies.

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And my job is to sit at my computer keyboard and capture for someone who's going to read

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it or see it.

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What I'm seeing play out in my mind, and I often have parts of a story like I didn't

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have Scorpion's name, but I had his background in my mind and it's kind of like

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flow. I don't know if you're familiar with the word flow.

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It's kind of become a hip or a used term these days, and I get caught in the flow of

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the story and like everything else disappears and I'm just capturing these

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characters and their universe.

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Which comes across.

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Rick It comes across that you're enjoying these characters as much as the reader is

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enjoying the characters.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Oh, I totally do.

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Yeah. I mean, they're like a second set of friends to me, you know?

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It's a different life that's going on there.

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But in my mind, it's as real as real life is because I get so lost in it that they become

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other characters in my life.

Wendy Green:

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Now, why did you decide to set this in early England?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Um, well, part of it is because of how much I really enjoy and have read all of Holmes and

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Poirot and Marple and many other of the the era English mysteries.

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And so I kind of am steeped as a reader in that.

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Um, but beyond that, I specifically put it in the era it is because it's it.

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Bridges When Poirot started coming to prominence and when Holmes had

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died. So this is the era, right, between those two events.

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So I thought this would be a good bridge era.

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Plus, it wasn't World War One was not involved yet.

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I didn't really want to deal with that in the writing.

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And also I found that the year 1910, England was an interesting year of a number of events

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happening, including George the fifth becoming King Edward the seventh had been his

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father. The first round trip flight over the English Channel was taken that year and it

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was taken by a man named Charles Rose, whose partner, Henry Royce.

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You can see where that led to Rose Royce.

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But Rose also became the first aviation fatality in English history that same year as

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well. And also the man who invented the toilet, Thomas Crapper, died that year.

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So I don't know.

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It was just cool. And as far as England, I've been to England many times.

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In fact, I was at a castle and I won a crossbow shooting contest.

Wendy Green:

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Oh, yeah, the crossbow.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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So some of what's in my books, I've been in hot air balloons, some of it, you know, kind

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of like does pull on experiences I've had.

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It just felt natural to me to put it then and there.

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Being a fan of that era, the Downton Abbey Sherlock Holmes era.

Wendy Green:

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Uh, yeah. Well, there certainly are fun.

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You know, when you start reading it, you're hearing that more old English kind of talk

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conversation. And so it takes for me, it took me a moment to get acclimated to that,

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but then the characters really do come alive.

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You've done a great job with that.

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Well, thank you. Yeah.

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So, um, as you said to me, you're 78, You're going to be 79 in July, I think you said.

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Correct? Yeah, in July.

Wendy Green:

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So. So how do you experience aging, Rick?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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How do I experience it?

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Well, think about it.

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I mean, I'd be lying if I didn't say it doesn't cross my mind, but I don't fear it.

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Um, you know, I.

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I happen to believe in the spiritual and quantum planes, and so I.

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I think there's a further adventure awaiting me after this life is done.

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I don't know what it'll be, but I'm looking forward to it as another adventure.

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Um, I also kind of look at aging as is interesting because I work because I want to,

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not because I have to, and also because I think of my age and experience.

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Um, people accept advice from me, you know, and some people look to me for, for advice

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and I enjoy that.

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I enjoy mentoring people, helping people.

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I've done that my whole life.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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And I guess as I get older, I've got more wisdom built up to impart.

Wendy Green:

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At the Blackstone Publishing Company you are working with, I think, much younger people.

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Is that right?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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In general, that is true.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Yes.

Wendy Green:

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Yeah. So how how does that play out?

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Do you feel like you're you're learning from them?

Wendy Green:

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They're learning from you.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Yes I am certainly not up on.

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As up on contemporary trends and things, probably as my younger counterparts.

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So I do learn from them every day and I hope that they take away things that that I do and

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learn from me. And I think it's a very great symbiotic relationship and I really, truly

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enjoy everybody I work with.

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And that's great.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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I mean, it's a fabulous work environment and culture and I couldn't ask for anything more.

Wendy Green:

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So I have to ask you, though, you know, many people in this age group find it very

Wendy Green:

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difficult to find another meaningful job.

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And certainly you're an executive there now.

Wendy Green:

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So that's a meaningful job that you have.

Wendy Green:

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How did you get introduced and get the opportunity that you have there?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Well, the opportunity to be an employee of Blackstone happened in this manner.

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I have a friend named Christopher who lives in Portland, Oregon.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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And Christopher comes from a very theatrical family.

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He himself is a film director.

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Film and TV director.

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He's an actor.

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He comes from England.

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In fact, he has proofed my books to make sure I got England right.

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But his uncle, great uncle, was James Barrie, who wrote Peter Pan.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Oh, wow. And Christopher owned and still owns the audio rights to Winnie the Pooh.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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So back in, I think it was 2006, Christopher called up one day and said to me and my wife,

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Deborah, I'm coming down to Ashland, where we live in Oregon, and I'm going to be

Rick Bleiweiss:

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licensed thing meeting with Blackstone Audio.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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It was audio at the time to license them Winnie the Pooh.

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And I said to him, What's a Blackstone?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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And he explained, you know, the Blackstone was one of the oldest and biggest audiobook

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companies. And he said, Do you mind when I'm down there if I stayed with you?

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We said, Of course. So he stayed with us.

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He met with Craig Black, who was the founder and owner of Blackstone, licensed him Winnie

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the Pooh. We still have it.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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And in the course of the conversations with Craig, Christopher mentioned me and my wife,

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Deborah. And you should know that Deborah, in addition to me, was also a senior

Rick Bleiweiss:

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executive in the music industry.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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Okay. And so Christopher said to Craig, you know, you, Rick and Deborah probably have

Rick Bleiweiss:

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some New York corporate knowledge that no one in your organization has.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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You know, they could probably add to your organization in some way.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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You should meet with them.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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So Craig called us and we met with him for lunch the next week.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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And at the end of the lunch, Craig said, I don't know exactly what I'm going to do with

Rick Bleiweiss:

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you, but Christopher was right.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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You do that my organization will benefit from.

Rick Bleiweiss:

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So how about joining my board of directors and becoming consultants to the company?

Rick Bleiweiss:

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And that's how it started.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

That lasted about a year.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Then Deborah retired fully and I went on staff, still on the board, and I've been with

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Blackstone ever since.

Wendy Green:

:

So that was very helpful to have a friend like that, to make that introduction.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Yeah, absolutely.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

You know what networking friends that, you know, that's an important part of life,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

period. You never know where friendships and networks are going to lead.

Wendy Green:

:

Yes, so true.

Wendy Green:

:

I think having having and learning how to ask for help from friends sometimes is

Wendy Green:

:

important.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

When when when Deborah and I left New York and retired from the music industry and moved

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

out here to southern Oregon, I quickly got bored.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I mean, I'm a total type-A personality.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I even once did biofeedback and they found that I was more relaxed when I was problem

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

solving than when I was trying to relax.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

So I got very bored and I joined the boards of directors of a number of local nonprofits,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

and I still didn't feel like I was really utilizing everything that was going on in my

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

brain, all the knowledge I had.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

So when this opportunity came along, I just went, Wow, this is great.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I mean, this is this will make me vital and vibrant again.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And coincidentally, at the same time, I started writing fiction.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

So it's sort of like the two tracks happened almost simultaneously, but independently.

Wendy Green:

:

And that's so interesting, you know, because I think sometimes when we clear the space for

Wendy Green:

:

from from our past and the other work that we used to do, new things can start to

Wendy Green:

:

evolve. And I was going to ask you about that because you had experience writing

Wendy Green:

:

non-fiction articles and stuff, right?

Wendy Green:

:

Was it a difficult transition to start writing fiction?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Honestly, no.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm not sure why I didn't do it earlier in my career, but I had a next door neighbor

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

here who was a poet, and she was in a writer's group with poets, memoirists,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

non-fiction writers, novelists.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And she had learned from me that I had written nonfiction.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

She said, Why don't you join the group?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Think people would like you?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

You'd like them. So I joined the group.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I really enjoyed the people and I just said, Hey, I'm going to try my hand.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Writing fiction and fiction stories just kept popping in my brain and channeling

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

through me.

Wendy Green:

:

That's amazing.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah, we used to play a game in the car when we were traveling, you know, where somebody

Wendy Green:

:

would give a little piece of a story and then somebody else would try and build onto

Wendy Green:

:

it. And. And but to sit down and write a whole book.

Wendy Green:

:

Man, I have a lot of admiration for you.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

You actually Scorpion is the third book.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I wrote. The first book that I wrote was a science fiction fantasy book.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

The second one was a magical realism road trip book.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And neither of those were able to get any kind of traction or publishing contract.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And even, in fact, my writing group, you know, when I wrote them, they liked them, but

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

they said, these aren't the ones.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

When I started reading them the very first of Scorpion to a person, they said, That's

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

the one.

Wendy Green:

:

Wow. So are other people in your writing group published?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Yes, many of them.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm not in that group anymore.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And fortunately, people moved away.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Few people passed away.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But yes, those who were and are still around, definitely many of them have been

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

published.

Wendy Green:

:

Huh. So tell me about your time in the music industry.

Wendy Green:

:

What was some of the highlights for you?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Wow. Some of the highlights.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Well, I've got to tell you, I.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I got to.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Certainly one of the highlights was producing records, you know, I mean, I, I

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

just as I said, I love the creative and I love the business.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And so I'll talk a little bit about both.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I loved I loved being a performer and I loved producing records.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And as you said, one of them got a Grammy nomination.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

It was a spoken word record with Steve Allen and Jayne Meadows in the early, early days of

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

home computers when there was like Texas Instruments and Commodore.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Right. And nobody really knew what was going on.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I, I put together it was my idea.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And I put together an idea, an album called Everything You Want to Know About Home

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Computers, but didn't Know Who to Ask.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And I had a computer expert write it and we did a whole booklet and the whole thing, and

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

it got nominated for Best Spoken Word.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And we lost out to Shari Lewis and her puppet Lamb Chop.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Oh.

Wendy Green:

:

I remember her.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

That happened. And I had another group that I put together called Moon Lion, and they were

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

in the disco era, and they were named by a music historian, one of the top instrumental

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

disco groups of all time.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And the NFL used one of their songs for three years in their holiday broadcasts.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And the other thing I just going through some papers recently I just discovered and I

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

had forgotten, was that another disco record I made with them was a disco version of Sweet

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Georgia Brown and the Harlem Globetrotters ended up using it as the version intro outro

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

for their TV show Popcorn Machine, and then for performances.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

So stuff like that I just absolutely loved.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I loved performing.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

My group opened for Three Dog Night the day the men landed on the moon.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Oh, wow. Three Dog Night refused to go on until the moon landing was over so they could

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

see it. So we ended up playing like three sets in a row.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Well, well, that was.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I love that. As far as business goes, I mean, I worked with them.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm not bragging here.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

It's just a fact. I worked with a tons and tons of superstar music acts, you know,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Whitney Houston, U2, Britney Spears, Backstreet Boys and NSYNC.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Um, I don't know.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm just David Bowie.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm forgetting many of them.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Sure.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And I enjoyed that.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But what I really, really loved was I got to work.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

As you had said earlier on, a lot of film soundtracks, and I worked on the first three

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Star Wars soundtracks.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Oh, nice.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I was at the Lucas Ranch and, you know, George was there, you know, and yeah, well,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

probably the funnest one was This is Spinal Tap.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I don't know if you remember that.

Wendy Green:

:

I do.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I put together the entire marketing campaign, not just for the album, but it almost became

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

the marketing campaign for the entire project.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And it was just a hoot working with the guys and Rob Reiner.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And, you know, I worked, um, Chariots of Fire.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And I remember we came out from the screening.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Some of our people are going, Well, there's no blood, there's no guts, there's no sex.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

How is this movie ever going to make it?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

You know? And of course, we had.

Wendy Green:

:

This brilliant movie.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah, exactly.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

So I just you know, it's hard to single things out because in general, I really enjoy

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

what I do. I've been fortunate that I've told my sons, if you work at your passion, it

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

will seem less like work.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I've always worked at my passion and it's always seemed like less work.

Wendy Green:

:

Which is such a gift, right?

Wendy Green:

:

My sister used to tell me that, and it didn't happen until I started doing the

Wendy Green:

:

podcast and coaching people.

Wendy Green:

:

Then I really felt it.

Wendy Green:

:

So I did a survey recently about retirement.

Wendy Green:

:

Mit put out a thing that said Men when they retire, they just want leisure and women need

Wendy Green:

:

to find purpose.

Wendy Green:

:

So I'm wondering, as you look around at your compadres, people, you know, I don't know

Wendy Green:

:

from 55 on up that might be thinking about retirement.

Wendy Green:

:

What do you see?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Um. I see too many people who aren't.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Uh, still being active.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

That doesn't mean they're not enjoying their lives, but they're.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

They're sort of like going, I don't have any new worlds to conquer.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And that's okay.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Because to me, it's whatever makes the individual happy that that's what life should

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

be about happiness and kindness.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And as long as you're happy, what does it matter?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But I don't see the difference.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And I guess by that definition, I must have a pretty strong feminine side.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But. But, um, I, I, I don't see a difference between the men and the women, although it is

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

interesting because in the nonprofits that I was working with here locally, there were

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

many, many more older women involved with them than men.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

There's no question of that.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Now, as I look back on it, I don't know if that's typical or not.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah, I don't know.

Wendy Green:

:

It's a it's an interesting question, you know, because I think I look at myself.

Wendy Green:

:

Right. I can't not have something meaningful to do.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah. And and then I guess the other question is, well, can leisure be meaningful?

Wendy Green:

:

And as you said, if you're happy with it, why not?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Yeah. Yeah. I'm not a pickleball player.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm not a bridge player.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm not a tennis player.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I guess I'm a couch potato in some ways.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And, you know, I just, you know, to me, the intellectual pursuits, the writing, the work,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

it's what keeps me energized.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

You know, Betty Friedan, you know, at a comment, a statement that I love, you know,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

she said, aging is not lost youth, but a new stage of opportunity and strength.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And yes, that's kind of how I look at life.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But that doesn't mean it's true for everyone.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But I don't think I would I would urge people who haven't tried, continue, who are

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

older and haven't tried continuing their pursuits in life.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

If they are unhappy in their position in life to try it, what have you got to lose?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

You know, I mean, I that's another thing.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I've never had an issue with rejection, you know, I mean, some people, it's like a dagger

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

through the heart.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I kind of think it goes with the territory.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

If you're trying something new or you're trying something that's intellectual or

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

creative, the likelihood is you're going to fail more likelihood than you're going to

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

succeed. So it comes with the territory, live with it.

Wendy Green:

:

Which is why I so wanted you on the show, because that's the philosophy I try to put

Wendy Green:

:

out here is, you know, try things, see what you like, what you don't like.

Wendy Green:

:

You can let it go, you know, But this is your time of life to to experiment, to try

Wendy Green:

:

new things, to write a mystery story.

Wendy Green:

:

Murder in hex fraud.

Wendy Green:

:

So this one actually has two mysteries in it.

Wendy Green:

:

Yes, I know.

Wendy Green:

:

Here I was reading during the rain and thinking, okay, we solved one and but there's

Wendy Green:

:

more pages.

Wendy Green:

:

I kind of.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Look at it that in real life, police officers don't necessarily have the luxury of only

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

working one face at a time or so.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Try to, you know, like go, okay, what would happen over the course of a month?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Would there just be one case?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Well.

Wendy Green:

:

Well, in this little England English town, like a couple of murders.

Wendy Green:

:

Several murders.

Wendy Green:

:

I was like, oh, dear, that's a very.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Well, if you look at murder, she wrote, and the small Cabot Cove, they had murder up the

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

line. And then if you look at Death in Paradise, which is one of my favorite britbox

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

shows, this little tiny island nation has murder after it comes with the territory.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah, Yeah.

Wendy Green:

:

And it's so fun how he brings in these these different kinds of characters from the barber

Wendy Green:

:

shop, you know, who have no police background but have an interest, and they ask

Wendy Green:

:

interesting questions. And of course you have to have the love interest in there.

Wendy Green:

:

So I'm not going to give that away.

Wendy Green:

:

No, but.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I will tell you that the female bookseller, bookstore owner, probably she and Scorpion

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

are my two single favorite characters.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah. Yeah.

Wendy Green:

:

And you know, it shows because you like talk about how they're dressed and their attire

Wendy Green:

:

and their their hats and yeah, it's.

Wendy Green:

:

It's fun.

Wendy Green:

:

So what's next for you, Rick?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Well, let's see. I'm, I'm.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

They've just finished half of.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And the full proposal for a business book on caring leadership.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Nice. So I've kind of reached back into my past and my experiences and my own style of

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

management and what I saw around me and kind of postulate that you don't have to be I'll

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

use the word you don't have to be an asshole to get good solid business results.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And in fact, in today's day and age, when the younger generations are caring so much

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

more about the culture they're working in and the jobs that they're doing, I think it's

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

important to have caring leadership to maximize businesses and staff these days so

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

that that book, my agent will be going out with that shortly.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Um, I'm writing my memoir and I'm writing that film script and had no idea what else,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

but I'll be writing something else.

Wendy Green:

:

Oh, by the way, you're also on the board and building this business, this publishing

Wendy Green:

:

company. Wow.

Wendy Green:

:

Do you sleep, Rick?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Yeah, actually, I sleep pretty well.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

The days I don't do a lot is when I don't sleep that well.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah. Yeah. So you don't, like, wake up at night with.

Wendy Green:

:

Oh, I know where this mystery's going.

Wendy Green:

:

That doesn't happen to you.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

It happens, but it usually happens when I wake up in the morning.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I don't prematurely wake up with an idea.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I can't say it never happened, but it's not usual.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I know. And I do have a patent and pen next to my on my nightstand just for that reason.

Wendy Green:

:

Interesting. Interesting.

Wendy Green:

:

Well, if you could, from your vantage point now and looking back at the people that we've

Wendy Green:

:

talked about, you know, the 55 and up, if you could give a couple of takeaways that you

Wendy Green:

:

think would benefit, maybe it's in the business realm, maybe it's in the personal

Wendy Green:

:

realm. What would you offer as a couple of takeaways?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Uh, well, the first takeaway would be have fun.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Seriously? The second one is don't stop living just because you're aging, you know?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

If you've got a dream and you've got the ability to energy to go for it, go for it.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Um, take shots, you know?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I mean, you think Wayne Gretzky said you miss 100% of the shots you don't take?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Or, you know, so.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

That's right. Exactly.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Um, and another thing I would say is think of your life positively.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Do you do you watch the show?

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Grace and Frankie?

Wendy Green:

:

I love that show.

Wendy Green:

:

Okay.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

There's a character on the show, Mary Elizabeth.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

She's one of the friends right now in the very last episode of the show.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Uh, Mary Elizabeth said something which was obviously written by the writers of the show,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

but it came out of her mouth.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But I agreed with so much.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I wrote it down so I wouldn't forget it.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And what Mary Elizabeth said was, You are always going to be disappointed if all you

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

remember are your failures.

Wendy Green:

:

Oh, beautiful.

Wendy Green:

:

That's right.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

So part of it is as you as you look at your life both going forward and looking back,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

don't be filled with angst, regret.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

You know, look at the the happy times in your life.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I try to remember my successes, not my failures.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah, that's.

Wendy Green:

:

I love that we.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah. And thank you.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm going to, if you don't mind for a second.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Okay. I would like to just quickly talk about a book that I acquired at Blackstone

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

that, okay.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Fits what we're doing.

Wendy Green:

:

And that we're going to hopefully have on in a future show.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And this is the book.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

It's called The Wisdom of Morrie by Morrie Schwartz Living in aging creatively and

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

joyfully. And Morrie is the Morrie of Tuesdays with Morrie.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And he wrote this book before he passed away, and his son and wife worked with the

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

manuscript, got it into shape.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And we've just published it recently to great acclaim, and it's doing unbelievably

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

well. But anybody that loved Tuesdays with Morrie, this is the natural extension.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

This is Morrie himself, in his own words, talking about how to age gracefully.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And it is a brilliant, brilliant book.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And I don't say that about a lot of books.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah. And you so graciously put me in touch with them.

Wendy Green:

:

So I'm hoping to get them scheduled probably this summer because we're booked out.

Wendy Green:

:

But yeah, I'm excited.

Wendy Green:

:

I'm excited about that.

Wendy Green:

:

Thank you, Rick.

Wendy Green:

:

That's going to be awesome.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah. So let me let people know how they can reach out to you.

Wendy Green:

:

Rick has a website.

Wendy Green:

:

Rick Bleiweiss Bly is spelled b.

Wendy Green:

:

L e. I y w e.

Wendy Green:

:

I s. S.com.

Wendy Green:

:

And so you can see the books there.

Wendy Green:

:

You can learn more about Rick.

Wendy Green:

:

You can also email him at created by Rick at gmail.com.

Wendy Green:

:

And you can find any of these books on Amazon.

Wendy Green:

:

Like I said, let's see, the first one is Pinion Scorpion and the Barbershop

Wendy Green:

:

Detectives. Okay.

Wendy Green:

:

This is where you meet all those lovely characters we were talking about.

Wendy Green:

:

And the second one is the murder in Oxford.

Wendy Green:

:

Are we going to have more Pinion Scorpion books, do you think?

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I should have mentioned that as well.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

I'm I've already written probably about 40% of a third Scorpion book in the the main

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

mystery or there will be multiple mysteries is about a young female magician who has a

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

delusion that is so mystifying that even Harry Houdini, who I write into the book,

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

can't figure it out.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

But wherever she performs mayhem and robbery and mystery, follow her.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And she paxford.

Wendy Green:

:

Yes. And you introduced her at the end of the Oxford book?

Wendy Green:

:

Yes. And then the compendium of short stories is called Hotel California, of which

Wendy Green:

:

Ricks short story mystery is in there.

Wendy Green:

:

Another surprise twist at the end of that one.

Wendy Green:

:

Yeah, that's that's.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

The first of a series of murder music and mystery books or anthologies.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

The next one is Thriller, which comes out this year and then next year is Back in Black

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

and Bat Out of Hell will be the one after that.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

And I've got a story in each of them.

Wendy Green:

:

Oh, gosh. Okay.

Wendy Green:

:

Well, I can't wait. I can't wait.

Wendy Green:

:

Thank you.

Wendy Green:

:

Well, let me tell the audience about our guest for next week.

Wendy Green:

:

It's a bit of a turn.

Wendy Green:

:

Last this whole past month, we've had authors, so now we're taking a shift.

Wendy Green:

:

So my guest next week is Linda Rivera.

Wendy Green:

:

And Linda is a coach, a counselor and the creator of 55 and Boulder.

Wendy Green:

:

After losing her husband of 53 years, Linda sunk into a deep despair.

Wendy Green:

:

And as she says, she slogged her way back through the bleak landscape of grief and

Wendy Green:

:

confusion to the brilliant world of regeneration and discovery.

Wendy Green:

:

And this is what we're going to talk about next week, moving on after loss.

Wendy Green:

:

And as you know, I always like to leave you with the belief that we can all live with

Wendy Green:

:

curiosity. Live with courage and live with relevance.

Wendy Green:

:

And we are never too old to set another goal or dream a new dream.

Wendy Green:

:

Rick, what a pleasure to have you on.

Wendy Green:

:

Thank you so much.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Oh, my pleasure.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

My pleasure.

Rick Bleiweiss:

:

Okay. Thank you for having me.

Wendy Green:

:

My name is Wendy Greene, and this has been.

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About the Podcast

Hey, Boomer
Welcome to Hey, Boomer, the podcast where candid conversations meet life-long learning, tailored for the active and discerning over-60 crowd.

Join us every week for insightful interviews and genuine discussions on the topics that matter most to help prepare us to live our best lives as we age.

While other podcasts may focus on reinvention after retirement, Hey, Boomer goes beyond the surface, exploring the complexities of family relationships, maintaining health, navigating caregiving, coping with divorce or widowhood, and embracing new relationships. It's the podcast that acknowledges the challenges and opportunities that come with aging, with a compassionate and realistic approach.

Hosted by Wendy Green, her conversational style ensures every episode feels like a heartfelt chat between friends. Her guests range from experts to everyday individuals, bring their wisdom and experiences to the table, creating an atmosphere of trust, understanding, and genuine connection.

And here's the best part: not only can you subscribe, rate, and review the podcast, but you can also become a Boomer Believer. As a Boomer Believer, you'll gain exclusive access to monthly live Zoom sessions with one of our guests, where you can ask questions directly and engage in enriching discussions. Plus, your support helps us continue our mission of providing valuable content and fostering a vibrant community of lifelong learners.

So, what are you waiting for? Subscribe to Hey, Boomer today, join the conversation, and become a proud Boomer Believer. Because life's greatest adventures are meant to be shared and celebrated, no matter your age.

About your host

Profile picture for Wendy Green

Wendy Green